UCSF

Curriculum Outcomes

February 2018

The PharmD curriculum prepares skilled, compassionate, patient-centered pharmacists to bring creative approaches to serve patients and meet challenges across health care. In developing the curriculum, the faculty identified the qualities desired in a UCSF PharmD graduate and outlined the curriculum outcomes essential for the UCSF PharmD to succeed and thrive.

These outcomes are based upon recommendations from the Center for the Advancement of Pharmaceutical Education (CAPE), which provides guidance to colleges and schools of pharmacy in the dynamic environment of contemporary pharmacy education. Our outcomes are grounded in the framework developed to guide UCSF Interprofessional Education (IPE) activities and identify common milestones for UCSF health professions graduates.

The UCSF PharmD Curriculum Outcomes, drawn from the 2015 CAPE Outcomes and UCSF IPE Outcomes, are outlined below.

Desired Quality of UCSF PharmD Graduate

PharmD Program Outcomes = CAPE Outcomes 2013 + UCSF’s IPE Outcomes 2015

A UCSF PharmD graduate should be a problem-solver; someone who can tolerate the ambiguity of real-world challenges and bring their knowledge and skills to bear on a problem.

1.1. Learner: Develop, integrate, and apply knowledge from the foundational sciences to evaluate the scientific literature, explain drug action, solve therapeutic problems, and advance population health and patient-centered care.

3.1. Problem solving: Identify problems; explore and prioritize potential strategies; and design, implement, and evaluate a viable solution.

4.3. Innovation and entrepreneurship: Engage in innovative activities by using creative thinking to envision better ways of accomplishing professional goals.

Their UCSF training will not impart all the requisite knowledge and skills; instead the development of a disposition to independent, lifelong learning is necessary.

3.1. Problem solving: Identify problems; explore and prioritize potential strategies; and design, implement, and evaluate a viable solution.

4.1. Self-awareness: Examine and reflect on personal knowledge, skills, abilities, beliefs, biases, motivation, and emotions that could enhance or limit personal and professional growth.

4.3. Innovation and entrepreneurship: Engage in innovative activities by using creative thinking to envision better ways of accomplishing professional goals.

The graduate should possess the capacity and readiness for leadership and will be expected to function responsibly and with accountability in their role on a team.

3.4., IPE-1, IPE-2, IPE-3. Interprofessional collaboration: Actively participate and engage as a healthcare team member by demonstrating mutual respect, understanding, and values to meet patient care needs.

4.2. Leadership: Demonstrate responsibility for creating and achieving shared goals, regardless of position.

4.4. Professionalism: Exhibit behaviors and values that are consistent with the trust given to the profession by patients, other healthcare providers, and society.

To succeed in the collaborative workforce of today and the future, excellent communication skills will be necessary of the graduate.

3.2. Educator: Educate all audiences by determining the most effective and enduring ways to impart information and assess understanding.

3.5. Cultural sensitivity: Recognize social determinants of health to diminish disparities and inequities in access to quality care.

3.6., IPE-2. Communication: Effectively communicate verbally and nonverbally when interacting with an individual, group, or organization.

Regardless of their work setting, the health of patients should be at the center of their efforts

1.1. Learner: Develop, integrate, and apply knowledge from the foundational sciences to evaluate the scientific literature, explain drug action, solve therapeutic problems, and advance population health and patient-centered care.

2.1. Patient-centered care: Provide patient-centered care as the medication expert (collect and interpret evidence, prioritize, formulate assessments and recommendations, implement, monitor and adjust plans, and document activities).

2.3. Health and wellness: Design prevention, intervention, and educational strategies for individuals and communities to manage chronic disease and improve health and wellness.

2.4. Population-based care: Describe how population-based care influences patient-centered care and influences the development of practice guidelines and evidence-based best practices.

3.3. Patient advocacy: Assure that patients’ best interests are represented.

3.5. Cultural sensitivity: Recognize social determinants of health to diminish disparities and inequities in access to quality care.

The graduate must understand healthcare systems and be able to demonstrate and quantify their value within the system.

2.2. Medication use systems management: Manage patient healthcare needs using human, financial, technological, and physical resources to optimize the safety and efficacy of medication use systems.

2.4. Population-based care: Describe how population-based care influences patient-centered care and influences the development of practice guidelines and evidence-based best practices.

At the same time, they should be able to view systems critically and be a driver for transformative change.

2.2. Medication use systems management: Manage patient healthcare needs using human, financial, technological, and physical resources to optimize the safety and efficacy of medication use systems.

4.2. Leadership: Demonstrate responsibility for creating and achieving shared goals, regardless of position.

4.3. Innovation and entrepreneurship: Engage in innovative activities by using creative thinking to envision better ways of accomplishing professional goals.

CAPE 2013 Educational Outcomes

Domain 1 – Foundational Knowledge

1.1. Learner (Learner): Develop, integrate, and apply knowledge from the foundational sciences (i.e., pharmaceutical, social​/​behavioral​/​administrative, and clinical sciences) to evaluate the scientific literature, explain drug action, solve therapeutic problems, and advance population health and patient-centered care.

Domain 2 – Essentials for Practice and Care

2.1. Patient-centered care (Caregiver): Provide patient-centered care as the medication expert (collect and interpret evidence, prioritize, formulate assessments and recommendations, implement, monitor and adjust plans, and document activities).

2.2. Medication use systems management (Manager): Manage patient healthcare needs using human, financial, technological, and physical resources to optimize the safety and efficacy of medication use systems.

2.3. Health and wellness (Promoter): Design prevention, intervention, and educational strategies for individuals and communities to manage chronic disease and improve health and wellness.

2.4. Population-based care (Provider): Describe how population-based care influences patient-centered care and influences the development of practice guidelines and evidence-based best practices.

Domain 3 - Approach to Practice and Care

3.1. Problem solving (Problem Solver): Identify problems; explore and prioritize potential strategies; and design, implement, and evaluate a viable solution.

3.2. Educator (Educator): Educate all audiences by determining the most effective and enduring ways to impart information and assess understanding.

3.3. Patient advocacy (Advocate): Assure that patients’ best interests are represented.

3.4. Interprofessional collaboration (Collaborator): Actively participate and engage as a healthcare team member by demonstrating mutual respect, understanding, and values to meet patient care needs.

3.5. Cultural sensitivity (Includer): Recognize social determinants of health to diminish disparities and inequities in access to quality care.

3.6. Communication (Communicator): Effectively communicate verbally and nonverbally when interacting with an individual, group, or organization.

Domain 4 – Personal and Professional Development

4.1. Self-awareness (Self-aware): Examine and reflect on personal knowledge, skills, abilities, beliefs, biases, motivation, and emotions that could enhance or limit personal and professional growth.

4.2. Leadership (Leader): Demonstrate responsibility for creating and achieving shared goals, regardless of position.

4.3. Innovation and entrepreneurship (Innovator): Engage in innovative activities by using creative thinking to envision better ways of accomplishing professional goals.

4.4. Professionalism (Professional): Exhibit behaviors and values that are consistent with the trust given to the profession by patients, other healthcare providers, and society.

UCSF Interprofessional Educational Outcomes 2015

The goal of IPE at UCSF is rooted in a set of common graduation milestones, which have been adopted by every professional school​/​program. By graduation, every health professions learner will be able to:

IPE-1. Use the knowledge of one’s own role and the roles of other health professionals to appropriately assess and address the health care needs of the patients and populations served.

IPE-2. Communicate with other health professionals in a responsive and responsible manner that supports a collaborative approach to the maintenance of health and the treatment of disease in individual patients and populations.

IPE-3. Work with other health professionals to establish and maintain a climate of mutual respect, dignity, diversity, ethical integrity, and trust.