UCSF

Tagged: Patient Care

The dean advocates for medication lists and pharmacist engagement in patient care

Medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the U.S., trailing cancer and heart disease. Many of those errors can be traced back to issues with medications.

By diligently tracking the medications that each patient takes, and bringing trained pharmacists into the fold of everyday patient care, our health system could be made more effective and safer, UCSF School of Pharmacy Dean B. Joseph Guglielmo, PharmD, explains in a recent article for The Conversation.

Update from the Dean – July 2018

Health at the molecular level: Decoding cellular signals, A trigger for tissue repair, Seeding tomorrow’s science; The future of custom care: Tracking cancer drug resistance, Treating malaria and tuberculosis, Quantitative Biosciences Institute’s culture of inclusivity, The genetics of asthma; Ensuring the best possible care: Using the right drugs, Keeping up with the testing boom; Update on the new PharmD curriculum: Welcoming our new students at the end of July; Education accolades: Competitio

Advanced practice pharmacists are ready

Pharmacists are going to be more integral to health care teams in the future.

Update from the Dean - September 2017

Strategic plan progress report. Research: Driving the development of innovative and precise drugs, medical devices, and diagnostic tests. Flu treatments; Tackling antimalarial resistance; Attacking hard targets; Plotting cell maps; Safer opioid pain killer; Cellular construction; New products through bioengineering; Regulatory science leadership; Tobacco burden in vulnerable populations; Economics of disease; Precision medicine.

Health care: The pharmacist-to-technician ratio

Capitol Weekly: Opinion

Let pharmacists empower patients and save lives

How do we give patients ready access to the expertise of pharmacists? How do we empower patients with medication knowledge?

Frear solves medication problems at the systems level

With a pharmacist dad and a degree in biochemistry, Meghan Frear was certain that pharmacy school was a perfect fit for her. However, she says, “When I first entered UCSF, I could not have articulated for you that I wanted to be a systems-level pharmacist.” “In undergrad I took an economics of health care course, which sounds so nerdy,” Frear recalls.

Ling takes policy know-how to the clinic

Tina Ling was born in a refugee camp in Thailand after her parents fled the genocide in Cambodia. Growing up in Southern California in an immigrant-rich community, she saw her parents and many of their neighbors struggle with their new country’s language, culture, and economics—including access to health care and health literacy.

Pong Dahl tackles medication and affordability challenges

After earning her PharmD, Pong Dahl completed a year-long residency at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, focusing her elective rotations in ambulatory care. She is now the supervisor for ambulatory care pharmacy services for the John Muir Physician Network (part of John Muir Health), which includes more than 1,000 primary and specialty care physicians in the East Bay.

Drysdale sees team-based patient care as essential

“What really got me into pharmacy,” says Troy Drysdale, “was when I realized the role of the pharmacist was bigger and more expansive than anything I’d ever experienced personally.”

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