UCSF

Tagged: Patient Care

Nancy Nkansah discusses drug and alcohol interactions on Dr. Oz

In her latest appearance on The Dr. Oz Show, Nancy Nkansah, PharmD, discussed the dangers of mixing alcohol and certain medications, including prescription anti-anxiety drugs as well as some over-the-counter painkillers, antihistamines, and cough suppressants.

The HIV pharmacist: helping patients pick and stick with lifesaving drugs

How do you convince patients who feel fine to take medicines that can have major side effects?

How can you help them stay on their lifesaving daily medications for years to come despite the obstacle course of everyday life?

How do you help patients and providers choose the best combination of three or more drugs from a selection of more than two dozen that work in multiple ways to fight a virus that can mutate to resist them?

Study finds including unpublished FDA data alters drug effectiveness outcomes

Every year U.S. drug regulators approve dozens of new medicines as “safe and effective,” but just how effective are they? How well do they alleviate specific aspects of illness, whether light sensitivity from migraine headaches or itching from eczema?

Partners in D program wins AACP Award for Student Community Service

Partners in D, the innovative program in which UCSF student pharmacists help both underserved seniors and fellow health professionals maximize the complex Medicare Part D drug benefit, has won a national award for community service.

Nancy Nkansah gives key tips for preventing drug interactions on Dr. Oz

Appearing on a segment of The Dr. Oz Show, Nancy Nkansah, PharmD, gave millions of TV viewers key tips on avoiding drug interactions as well as errors in the filling of their medications.

Nkansah, a faculty member in the Department of Clinical Pharmacy, UCSF School of Pharmacy, noted that:

William Soller defines the roadmap for Rx-to-OTC switches

If you are a pharmaceutical company seeking to switch your prescription medication to one sold directly to consumers—as an over-the-counter or OTC drug—William Soller, PhD, has your road map.

In a recently published study, Soller and co-authors analyzed the questions framing U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee deliberations on prescription(Rx)-to-OTC switches since 2002—focusing on those addressing the first switches in a given drug class.

UCSF Robotic Pharmacy ranked “Best of What’s New” 2011 by Popular Science

The robotic pharmacy at the UCSF Medical Center is the recipient of a 2011 Best of What’s New designation by Popular Science. Each year since 1987, the publication reviews thousands of innovations and chooses the top 100 winners that represent significant steps forward. The robotic pharmacy uses robotic technology and electronics to automate the preparation and tracking of medications with the goals of improving patient safety and increasing efficiency.

Consortium inventing medical devices for children gets new funding

A two-year-old, cross-disciplinary effort to invent new medical devices for children, co-founded by bioengineer Shuvo Roy, PhD, has received a two-year $1 million grant from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to expand its work.

Lisa Bero heads new WHO center studying, promoting global access to vital drugs

The office of Lisa Bero, PhD, on UCSF’s Laurel Heights campus has long been a key portal between the School of Pharmacy and the world at large, including countries where billions of people cannot get even the most vital life-saving drugs.

Drugs screened for effects on key transporters, risk of dangerous interactions

To reduce the risk of toxic drug interactions, UCSF's Kathy Giacomini, PhD, and colleagues are screening thousands of prescription drugs, testing how much they inhibit key proteins in kidney and liver cells that help clear medications from the body.

This is the first large-scale screening of drugs for their potential to inhibit drug transporters—proteins in cell membranes that control the entry and exit of drugs.

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