UCSF

Tagged: Research

Zev Gartner named one of Popular Science’s ‘Brilliant 10’ of 2015

The next frontier in developing therapies for cancer and other diseases could come through studying organ development or tumor growth in living humans. Problem is, there’s no ethical way of doing that using current technology.

Zev Gartner, PhD, has focused on the next best thing: His lab is building fully functioning 3-D human tissue, cell by cell.

Antibody Network partners with Celgene to develop cancer therapies

A new collaboration between Celgene Corp. and the Recombinant Antibody Network (RAN) will support the development of next-generation, antibody-based cancer therapies. The RAN is a consortium comprising researchers from the UCSF School of Pharmacy (UCSF Antibiome Center), the University of Chicago, and the University of Toronto.

Roy receives JDRF funding to develop implants to treat type 1 diabetes

UCSF School of Pharmacy faculty member Shuvo Roy, PhD, has received a three-year $1 million grant to create surgically implantable capsules of donor pancreas cells to free type 1 diabetes patients from daily insulin injections and the disease’s potentially life-threatening complications. The work is being funded by JDRF, the largest charitable supporter of type 1 diabetes research.

Virtual health care evaluated by UCSF and Stanford

Student pharmacists at the UCSF School of Pharmacy and a student at the Stanford Graduate School of Business are teaming with a UCSF School of Pharmacy health economics professor to understand the rapidly evolving virtual health care world and how it is impacting the efficiency, effectiveness, and cost of care.

Kroetz leads new study of genetics of cancer drugs’ dose-limiting side effects

Taxanes are a class of drugs widely used to treat a variety of cancers, including breast, ovarian, lung, gastric, and head and neck. But dosages are often limited by toxic side effects—most commonly damage to the body’s peripheral nerves, causing numbness, pain, and/or hyper-sensitivity—that can require reduced or suspended treatment and which can linger for years in disease survivors.

Study discovers why leading gout medication is ineffective for many

Allopurinol, the first-choice medication for treating gout—an excruciatingly painful condition that is the most common form of inflammatory arthritis, afflicts more than eight million Americans, and is on the rise worldwide—is not fully effective in more than half of patients.

Study discovers simple rules underlying complex brain development in fly

How does brain circuitry organize itself during development? In at least one case—the seemingly complex visual system of the fruit fly, which connects its 800-facet compound eyes to its brain—the answer lies in just three simple rules.

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