UCSF

2018 News

Chest x-ray, showing a possible lung cancer tumor.
Many types of lung cancer thwart even the most targeted of therapies due to drug resistance, but a group of UCSF scientists led by Sourav Bandyopadhyay, PhD, have now shown that adding a second drug into treatment regimens can overcome this resistance in lab-grown, lung cancer cell lines.
Ortiz de Montellano
Ortiz de Montellano gained renown for his work with cytochrome P450 enzymes, which help the liver metabolize drugs and other chemicals, and regulate hormone levels.
Krogan
In a pair of recent studies, scientists at the Quantitative Biosciences Institute uncovered how Ebola, dengue, and Zika hijack human proteins to infect human cells, findings that point to new approaches for treating these diseases.
Savic speaking at podium
Tuberculosis is usually treated with a six month regimen of daily antibiotics, but millions of patients do not recover from the disease during treatment. Rada Savic’s team showed that adjusting the duration of this regimen based on disease severity could lead to better outcomes.
composite of Langridge, Kollman, Kuntz, and a wasabi receptor computer graphic
Drug discovery today begins with computation rather than test tube experimentation. Three School of Pharmacy faculty emeriti, Robert Langridge, Irwin “Tack” Kuntz, and the late Peter Kollman, were awarded the UCSF Medal for creating computational tools for drug discovery that are now used worldwide.
Guglielmo
Curriculum transformation, An expanded role, Gaining recognition, Graduate match rate; School of Pharmacy scientists receive UCSF Medal: Founding fathers of drug discovery honored; Beyond drugs, Two artificial pancreas projects, Bringing prosthetics to patients; Beyond drugs, Two artificial pancreas projects, Bringing prosthetics to patients; Advancing the fight against cancer, Combining drug therapies, Mapping cells; In memoriam: Robert D. Gibson A lifetime of pharmacy and advocacy
Matheny demonstrates prosthetic arm to onlookers
The patient perspective on prosthetic limbs currently doesn’t factor into the FDA approval process. Leslie Wilson and Matthew Garibaldi are surveying patient preferences to speed access to the next generation of prosthetics.
PharmD student prepares flu vaccine for the dean
UCSF Flu Crew reminds San Francisco of the importance of vaccines by overseeing the vaccination of School of Pharmacy Dean Guglielmo.
Youmans holds her induction plaque next to Poncelet and Lucey.
School of Pharmacy Vice Dean Sharon Youmans, PharmD, MPH, was inducted into the UCSF Haile T. Debas Academy of Medical Educators in September, in recognition of her leadership during the School's revamping of its PharmD curriculum.
Krogan
UCSF’s Quantitative Biosciences Institute (QBI), founded two years ago, is making waves with its unique approach to scientific collaboration, catalyzing discoveries from cancer to psychiatry while supporting female scientists and engaging with the public.
Roy holds a silicon filter used in his artificial kidney prototype.
Inspiration can be a hard thing to find. The history of science is filled with elusive “eureka moments” taking place under unlikely circumstances—Archimedes’ jump in a bath to intuit displacement, Issac Newton’s observation of a falling apple to grasp gravity, and Nikola Tesla’s inspiration for the electric induction motor, which came as he was observing a sunset in a park and quoting Faust. In the halls of UC San Francisco, sometimes inspiration comes knocking on the door.
PharmD students recite the Oath of a Pharmacist
The School of Pharmacy's newest cohort of PharmD students donned white coats and took the Oath of a Pharmacist at the 2018 White Coat Ceremony, committing themselves to a lifetime of learning and patient care.
Giacomini
Kathy Giacomini, PhD, an expert in pharmacogenomic transporter biology and regulatory science, is the 2018 Bill Heller Mentor of the Year Award recipient from the American Foundation for Pharmaceutical Education (AFPE) for her mentorship of students. The award recognizes university faculty members, nominated by their students and current or past AFPE Fellows, for their guidance, dedication, leadership, instruction, and encouragement.
Arkin
Michelle Arkin, PhD, has received the 2018 Breakthrough Science Initiative Award from the Ono Pharma Foundation to study a class of proteins, called 14-3-3 proteins, known to be involved in various cancers, with the ultimate goal of enabling discoveries that lead to new ways to treat cancer.
Gibson
A beloved educator and alumnus of the UCSF School of Pharmacy, Robert D. Gibson, PharmD ’58, died on July 19 at the age of 93. Gibson had an illustrious career over five decades at UCSF and was a strong national leader for diversity in the pharmacy profession.
Guglielmo
Medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the U.S., trailing cancer and heart disease. Many of those errors can be traced to issues with medications. By diligently tracking the medications that each patient takes, and bringing trained pharmacists into the fold of everyday patient care, our health system could be made more effective and safer, UCSF School of Pharmacy Dean B. Joseph Guglielmo, PharmD, explains in a recent article for The Conversation.
PharmD students arrive at UCSF for the first day of classes.
A new class of UCSF doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students came together on July 25 at the Parnassus campus to inaugurate a new curriculum built on critical thinking, problem solving, and an inquiry habit of mind.
Cancerous breast tissue, with normal connective tissue (pink) and cancer cells (blue).
Cancer, fundamentally, is a problem of too much growth. For decades, health care providers have tried and failed to slow tumor growth using drugs that interfere with a particular signaling pathway, called PI3K, which is known to operate in proliferating cancer cells.
microscope image of cells
If it’s hard to take an accurate census of the 325 million people living in the US, it’s even more daunting to survey the 37.2 trillion or so cells that make up the human body. The brain alone, for instance, contains nearly 90 billion neurons, which can be classified into over a thousand distinct cell types. But these numbers are informed estimates—the true diversity of cells in the brain, let alone throughout the body, remains out of reach.
Guglielmo
Health at the molecular level: Decoding cellular signals, A trigger for tissue repair, Seeding tomorrow’s science; The future of custom care: Tracking cancer drug resistance, Treating malaria and tuberculosis, Quantitative Biosciences Institute’s culture of inclusivity, The genetics of asthma; Ensuring the best possible care: Using the right drugs, Keeping up with the testing boom; Update on the new PharmD curriculum: Welcoming our new students at the end of July; Education accolades: Competitio
Study captures an opioid drug binding to a µ-opioid receptor
Despite using opioids for centuries for pain management, we still don’t have a complete understanding of how drugs like morphine and oxycodone actually work. And that’s a problem for patients, who must weather side effects that can range from nausea and constipation to cognitive impairment, addiction, and, at high doses, even death.
Gruenberg
Katherine Gruenberg, PharmD ’15, BCPS, a faculty member in the UCSF School of Pharmacy’s Department of Clinical Pharmacy, was awarded the 2018 Sustainability Award in the faculty category by the UCSF Academic Senate Sustainability Committee on June 27, 2018.
Guglielmo speaks at podium.
For UCSF School of Pharmacy alumni who attended the event, Alumni Weekend 2018 offered a chance to explore how science connects the School’s research, education, and patient care agendas; learn about the lives and professional accomplishments of pharmacy school graduates; and get a glimpse of what’s under way at UCSF beyond the School. The annual campuswide event was held at the Hyatt Regency San Francisco on June 1 and 2.
Kathleen B. Kennedy
On June 2, 2018, Kathleen B. Kennedy, PharmD ’78, received the 2018 Distinguished Alumnus of the Year Award from the UCSF Pharmacy Alumni Association, for her “outstanding contributions to the profession of pharmacy, to society, and/or to UCSF.” As the dean of the College of Pharmacy, Xavier University of Louisiana, she has been a national advocate for lessening health disparities by strengthening the underlying health of communities.
Manglik
Aashish Manglik, MD, PhD, the newest member of the faculty of the UCSF School of Pharmacy’s Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, was named a Pew Biomedical Scholar on June 14. The award supports early career faculty members who have demonstrated “outstanding promise as contributors in science relevant to human health,” and provides each awardee with $300,000 over four years to help them get their growing labs off the ground.
UCSF Magazine summer 2018
UCSF School of Pharmacy scientists, across all three departments and in widely divergent fields, are continually questioning the status quo.
Seiple
The Beckman Young Investigator award provides research support to the most promising young faculty members in the early stages of their academic careers in the chemical and life sciences.
Joyce Rifkind and Gary Rifkind
The Gary Rifkind Awards recognize and celebrate clinical pharmacy research.
Conan MacDougall
Conan MacDougall, PharmD, was recently selected for the Emerging Teaching Scholar Award by the American Association of Colleges Pharmacy (AACP) Council of Faculties.
Savic
Low-cost drug treatments can cure TB and malaria. Why, then, do these diseases claim so many lives?
Phillips
Every day, on average, ten new genetic tests become commercially available to help doctors and patients make more informed decisions about health care.
smiling graduate
The 122 members of the graduating class of 2018 received their PharmD degrees at the commencement ceremony.
Yiqi Cao, second from right, earns second place in the UC Grad Slam Finals.
Yiqi Cao, a bioengineering PhD candidate, detailed a promising solution she developed for a heart stent that doesn’t trigger scar tissue buildup.
Sali
Andrej Sali, PhD, has been elected as a member of the 2018 class of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).
Burchard
The UCSF Asthma Collaboratory celebrates 20 years of research on genetic factors in asthma.
Eleanor Vogt
Eleanor Vogt, PhD, RPh, has been named the president of the board of directors for the American Pharmacists Association Foundation.
Bandyopadhyay
New research promises to take the guesswork out of matching individual cancer cases to the most effective choices of chemotherapy.
Kathy Giacomini
Kathy Giacomini, PhD, has been named the 2018 Volwiler Research Achievement Award recipient by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy.
Kennedy
Kathleen B. Kennedy, PharmD ’78, has been named our Distinguished Alumnus of the Year.
Burlingame with scientific equipment.
Collaborative research holds promise for harnessing the nervous system’s own repair programs.
Lei Wang and Nanxi Wang
A culture of discovery and collaboration among faculty carries potential to “completely shake up their fields of study.”
diagram
If DNA is the blueprint for every cell in the body, then proteins are the cell’s construction workers, forklifts, and building materials.
Guglielmo.
A new PharmD curriculum; Implementing new practice opportunities for pharmacists; PharmD students shine in state and national clinical pharmacy competitions; A pioneer in pharmacogenomics; The NIH streak lives on; Improving adverse event reporting and medication therapy protocols; Big-data to cut drug discovery time; Computational approaches target dopamine receptors; Researchers expose industry manipulation of science by sugar industry; Women in science; Bioengineering devices to treat glaucoma
Koda-Kimble
The 2018 Mary Anne Koda-Kimble Seed Award for Innovation marked its fourth year of funding with the announcement of the research award recipients.
Babbitt
Babbitt's election as a 2018 ISCB fellow highlights her contributions to the fields of computational biology and bioinformatics.
Youmans and Burningham
Vice Dean Sharon Youmans shares her perspective on the School’s new PharmD curriculum.
Wells
Scientists identify a signature of cancers caused by mutant RAS that may lead to precise therapies.
Huang at reception
Even with the best of microscopes, it's still a challenge to visualize the "inner life" of the cell.
illustration of mouse embryo and folded tissue shapes
Researchers were able to coax layers of cells to form shapes not found in nature, such as cubes.